HBSC England Factsheet series: mental well-being of school-aged children

The importance of mental health and well-being has been emphasised by the WHO when they say: “Mental health and well-being are fundamental to quality of life, enabling people to experience life as meaningful and to be creative and active citizens. Mental health is an essential component of social cohesion, productivity, and peace and stability in the living environment, contributing to social capital and economic development in societies” (WHO, 2005, p. 1). 

This factsheet presents findings on Mental well-being from the 2021-2022 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study in England, which used data from 5377 adolescents aged 11, 13 and 15 years old. 

DOWNLOAD

HBSC England Factsheet series: Adolescents’ experiences of sleep

This factsheet presents findings from the 2021-2022 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study in England, which reports on data from 5377 young people aged 11, 13 and 15. Data was collected with the support of a representative sample of 37 schools from across England. 

HBSC is an international study conducted in collaboration with the World Health Organisation (WHO) capturing data on young people’s health, health behaviours and social environment. 

DOWNLOAD

HBSC England Factsheet series: Life satisfaction of adolescents

Life satisfaction is one of the key measures of adolescent well-being, capturing the degree of mainly positive dimensions of mental health in youth (Mazur et al., 2018).
Life satisfaction has been shown to mediate between adolescents’ positive school relationships and their mental health, but also, to be protective of mental health (Cavioni et al., 2021).
This factsheet presents findings from the 2021-2022 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study in England, which used data from 5377 adolescents aged 11, 13 and 15 years old.

DOWNLOAD

HBSC England Factsheet series: Adolescents’ experiences of neighbourhood belonging

We asked our 11, 13 and 15 year old participants to respond to the NEIGHBOURHOOD SENSE OF BELONGING scale which presents statements about COMMUNITY SUPPORT, COHESIVENESS, RESOURCES AND SAFETY.
Their responses generated an overall NEIGHBOURHOOD SENSE OF BELONGING (NSB) score.
We used cut off points to define the proportion of adolescents reporting ‘HIGH NSB’ and ‘LOW NSB’.

DOWNLOAD