Reports referencing HBSC2018-12-22T01:21:35+00:00

Adolescent obesity and related behaviours: trends and inequalities in the WHO European Region, 2002–2014

The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey is a WHO collaborative cross-national study that monitors the health behaviours, health outcomes and social environments of boys and girls aged 11, 13 and 15 years every four years. HBSC has collected international data on adolescent health, including eating behaviours, physical activity, sedentary behaviour and, more recently, overweight and obesity, for over 25 years, allowing prevalence to be compared across countries and over time. This report presents the latest trends in obesity, eating behaviours, physical activity and sedentary behaviour from the HBSC study and highlights gender and socioeconomic inequalities across the WHO European Region. Trends have previously been reported separately, but this report brings together for the first time HBSC data on obesity and obesity-related behaviours to review the latest evidence and consider the range and complexity of factors influencing childhood obesity.

The health and well-being of men in the WHO European Region: better health through a gender approach

Although declining, high levels of premature mortality among men in some countries of the WHO European Region and gaps between men within countries require specific attention. A growing evidence base on the effectiveness of gender-responsive approaches to men’s health, and on the positive health impact gender equality policy has on men, need to be considered in relation to improving the health of men and women. Building on the guiding principles of the 2030 Agenda and Health 2020, and the interconnected nature of Sustainable Development Goals 3, 5 and 10, a strategy on the health and well-being of men in the WHO European Region will be considered by the 68th session of the WHO Regional Committee for Europe in September 2018. This report provides a background to the strategy and presents a snapshot of the evidence of the health issues men face and the underlying social determinants of health. It takes a special focus on the impact of gender norms and stereotypes on health while also looking at gender-responsive health system approaches for men’s health, and the health impacts of gender equality policy and engagement of men in achieving gender equality goals…

EUROPEAN HEALTH REPORT 2018 More than numbers — evidence for all

The European Region has passed the half-way point of the Health 2020 implementation period. In this chapter we assess the extent to which progress has been made towards the targets as defined in the Health 2020 monitoring framework. It provides an overview of progress made by the Member States towards reaching the Health 2020 targets at the regional level in relation to the agreed 2010 baseline. The Health 2020 monitoring framework (Annex 1) is the backbone of this report. It has three main components: burden of disease and risk factors; healthy people, well-being and determinants; and processes, governance and health systems.

Adolescent alcohol-related behaviours: trends and inequalities in the WHO European Region, 2002–2014

The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey is a WHO collaborative cross-national study that monitors the health behaviours, health outcomes and social environments of boys and girls aged 11, 13 and 15 years every four years. HBSC has collected international data on adolescent health, including alcohol consumption and drinking behaviours, for over 30 years, allowing prevalence to be compared across countries and over time. This report presents the latest trends in alcohol consumption and drinking behaviours among 15-year-olds across the WHO European Region, taken from the HBSC study. It highlights gender and socioeconomic inequalities across the Region. Trends have previously been reported separately, but this report brings together for the first time a broader range of HBSC data on adolescent alcohol consumption and drinking behaviours to review the latest evidence and highlight differences in alcohol use by gender, socioeconomic position and geographic subregion.

Developing a Global Indicator on Bullying of School-aged Children

The rate of bullying among children is a key indicator of children’s well-being and an important marker for comparing global social development.  Inevitably, these concerns have contributed to bullying becoming a globally recognised challenge – every region in the world collects information on children’s experiences of bullying.

Developing a Global Indicator on Bullying of School-aged Children

Nqobile is taking a stand against violence in and around her school. And she is starting by speaking up about what happened to her. At age 13, Nqobile was sexually assaulted on her way home from school in South Africa. In the aftermath, she struggled with self-confidence and feelings of shame…

School violence and bullying: Global status and trends, drivers and consequences

School violence and bullying includes physical, psychological and sexual violence and bullying (Figure 1). Violence and bullying in schools is mostly perpetrated by peers but, in some cases, by teachers and other school staff. Monitoring progress towards the goal of providing safe, non-violence, inclusive and effective learning environment requires accurate, up-to-date data, which include trend data. Existing data on school violence and bullying are therefore a critical component of these monitoring efforts by the education sector…

Safety Net: Cyberbullying’s impact on young people’s mental health Inquiry report

The internet has become an integral part of our lives, opening up many social and educational opportunities. It has become particularly important in the lives of children and young people who are accessing the internet more regularly, with more devices, and for longer periods. Young people are now using a diverse and evolving range of social media networks and platforms to connect and communicate with their peers…

Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health Provision: a Green Paper

All young people deserve the best start in life. But too often, young people with a mental health problem are not able to fulfil their potential. Mental ill-health costs individuals, and society, dearly. And we know that adults with mental ill-health are likely to have already experienced mental health problems in their childhood or adolescence…

KEY DATA ON YOUNG PEOPLE 2017 Latest information and statistics

The transition from childhood to adulthood is an important, fascinating period of life. Young people in their teens and early 20s need particular support and special services, particularly those who may be marginalised. Pulling together age specific data about this age group can lead to a better understanding of their health needs, and can help us to provide more appropriate, youth-friendly health services…

Building the Future Children and the Sustainable Development Goals in Rich Countries

For the past 70 years, UNICEF has played a leading role in calling for more and better data on the situation of children worldwide. In recent decades, the organization has established surveys and extensive cross-national databases of indicators relating to the well-being of children, including the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) programme…

Child health in 2030 in England: comparisons with other wealthy countries

The health of today’s children and young people (CYP) will be one of the key factors in determining
whether England is healthy and prosperous over the next 50 years. We used long-term historical data on key CYP health outcomes and various projection modelling methods to estimate CYP outcomes in 2030 in England compared with other wealthy European and western countries. Our comparison group was the EU15+, consisting of the 15 countries of the EU in 2004 plus Australia, Canada and Norway. Our projections of likely outcomes in 2030 are based upon the assumption that recent trends will continue for the next decade in both England/the UK and, on average, across the EU15+. This assumption is a limitation but one that is common to all forecasting…

Children and young people’s mental health—the role of education

First Joint Report of the Education and Health Committees of Session 2016–17
The education system has a front line role in children and young people’s mental health and well-being. Evidence to this inquiry suggested a growing prevalence of mental ill-health among children and young people, particularly for behavioural and emotional conditions such as anxiety, depression and conduct disorders. 50% of mental illness in adult life (excluding dementia) starts before age fifteen and 75% has started by age eighteen. According to the last ONS prevalence survey, in 2004, around 10% of children between five and sixteen had a clinically diagnosed mental disorder…